Announcements

Now offering the following Spring 2020 1.5 credit courses:

Topics in Latino and/or Caribbean Studies
Subtitle: Haitians in the Diaspora
Course Number: 01:595:281:MA
Instructor: Eliezer Marcellus This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Tues Per 6/7 (5-8pm), LSH-B112, Livingston
START: 3/10/20, END: 4/28/20
Add Deadline: 3/24/2020
*Credit not given for both this course and another 595:281 course with same subtitle.
This course explores Haitian migration not only to the United States, but also elsewhere throughout Latin America and the Caribbean and the world. It focuses on transnational relations as well as the significance of the Haitian diaspora for Haiti.

Topics in Latino and/or Caribbean Studies
Subtitle: Global Citizen: NGOs in Haiti
Course Number: 01:595:281:MB
Instructor: Eliezer Marcellus This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Wed Per 7/8 (6:40-9:30pm), LSH-B105, Livingston
START: 3/11/20, END: 4/29/20
Add Deadline: 3/25/2020
*Credit not given for both this course and another 595:280 or 595:281 course with same subtitle
This course explores the changing roles of international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in Haiti. No other country in the world has more NGOs per capita as Haiti, and since the 2010 earthquake the numbers have drastically increased. We will explore topics such as funding, effectiveness, and others that are relevant to NGOs in Haiti. One key question we will examine is what happened to all the aid that was given post-earthquake? The goal of this course is to improve your understanding of the networks and relationships among NGOs, governments, and multilateral institutions and the theories that guide their work in Haiti. Through readings and discussion, students will obtain the background necessary to analyze past and present debates about the role of NGOs in international humanitarian aid and development work. The course is especially relevant for students who are interested in development work in international, national, or community organizations or as administrators, policy analysts, or researchers in educational institutions.

Topics in Latino and/or Caribbean Studies
Subtitle: Maroons and Marronage
Course Number: 01:595:281:MC
Instructor: Karma Frierson This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Mon & Wed (3:20-4:40pm), LSH-A256, Livingston
START: Mon 3/23/20, END: Mon 5/4/20
Add Deadline: 3/25/20 (NO SPNs due to classroom size)
*Credit not given for both this course and another 595:280 or 595:281 course with same subtitle
What did it mean to free yourself from enslavement in Latin America? How does agency, resistance, and complicity emerge in the transition from unfreedom to freedom? What legacies of that action exist in contemporary narrations of the past? Through historical and anthropological research as well as through fiction, film, music, and comics, we explore these questions and more as we examine the practices of self-liberation known as marronage and the lifeways and experiences of those individuals, known as maroons. First, we examine broad themes such as freedom, independence, and resistance throughout Latin America. We then explore how these narratives of freedom and resistance have been used in the present day for a variety of purposes, from commemoration to tourism to activism. By following the lives and afterlives of maroons in Latin America, this course asks us to critically engage with the often ignored co-authors of Latin America’s past, present, and future.

Themes in Latin American Studies
Subtitle: Latin America: A Brief Introduction
Course Number: 01:590:100:MA
Instructor: Karma Frierson This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Schedule: Mon & Thurs (10:20-11:40am), LSH-A256, Livingston
START: Mon 3/23/20, END: Mon 5/4/20
Add Deadline: 3/26/20 (NO SPNs due to classroom size)
What is Latin America and how has it impacted the course of human history? This brief introductory course offers a multidisciplinary approach to the region and idea known as Latin America. It asks us to think critically about the conditions that made possible this socio-cultural landscape as well as what the concept of Latin America makes possible. Through this course, students will be able to trace the ties that bind the region together while also attending to the particularities and multiplicities encompassed within the idea of Latin America. Through analyzing primary documents, reading works of fiction, and analyzing documentaries and international reports, we will explore how Latin America is imagined at different times and for different audiences. Using a multimedia approach, this course will span the pre-Encounter moment through the contemporary moment, with a special focus on mixture as an organizing principle of Latin America.